Blondies with Nuts & Fruit

April 9, 2009

Melt 2 sticks of butter in a saucepan. Turn off the heat, and stir in two cups of sugar, then 1 cup of flour. Beat 4 eggs in a glass, then stir them into the mixture. Add a couple of handfuls of nuts and dried fruit, pour the batter into a greased brownie pan, and bake at 350 degrees for about 20 minutes, or until the blondies are done.

I used macadamia nuts, dried cherries, dried apricots cut into quarters, and coconut, but there are lots of delicious things you could add instead. Here are some possible combinations:

Lemon zest, lemon juice, and almonds

Walnuts, raisins, chopped apples, and a bit of cinnamon and nutmeg

Orange zest, orange juice, craisins, and pecans


How to Pack Lunch and Eat Breakfast Simultaneously

March 9, 2009

Ingredients in order of appearance: water, oatmeal, milk, dried apricots, apple, blue cheese, couscous, walnuts, almonds, carrots, Brazil nuts, grapes, orange.

Technique (aka cooking with your mouth full):

Put a pot of water on to boil. Better yet, switch on the electric teapot.

Pour some oatmeal and milk in a bowl. Microwave it for a minute.

Start chopping up a bunch of dried apricots and an apple.

Microwave the oatmeal for another minute. For some reason, this keeps my microwave from turning my oatmeal into a volcano.

Finish chopping up fruit. Chop up a wedge of blue cheese.

When the water boils, pour it over a bowl of couscous, and cover the bowl with a plate. You want a one-to-one ratio of couscous and boiling water, but I usually just eyeball it.

Dump the apples on top of the oatmeal, add some walnuts, and eat it while rummaging through the fridge for carrots and grapes. Put the carrots and grapes in a ziploc bag with some Brazil nuts. Make sure the grapes are on top.

Keep eating while you rummage around for an orange.

Check to see if the couscous has absorbed all the water. Couscous cooks in about five minutes, so it should be done by the time you’ve had half your oatmeal.

Scrape the couscous into a tupperware container, add the apricots and blue cheese, and top it off with a bunch of almonds.

Keep eating. Deposit all lunch items (couscous, carrots & nuts, orange) in backpack.

Scarf the last bite of oatmeal while tying shoes. Run for train.


What’s In My Lunch Bag, or Evidence That I am a Nomad

January 30, 2009

Remember when I was saying that it’s very important to pack a satisfying amount of food?

Here’s what I packed for lunch yesterday:

One and a half loaves of homemade oatmeal bread

One wedge of homemade cornbread

One tupperware container full of homemade cheese grits and homemade Brazilian black bean soup

An entire box of Stoned Wheat crackers

A tub of hummus

A bag full of almonds, walnuts, pecans, cashews, raisins, craisins, and dried cherries

Half of a very large carrot, many celery sticks, and a few sprigs of broccoli

An orange

A banana

Six homemade brownies

Do not fear, gentle reader. I did not consume all this food in one setting. So far, I have eaten two lunches, one dinner, many snacks, and I shared some of my bread with Jerry. And I still have leftovers! There’s enough for lunch and snacks tomorrow, too.

Why, you may ask, did I pack enough food for three days? Because I am a nomad, and I like to carry my food with me as I traipse about the law library.

Also, bad things happen when I pack a “normal” amount of food. First, I eat my lunch at 10 a.m. Then, I realize that I am starving and I buy lunch number two. Two hours later, I am starving and I buy a brownie. Basically, I am a bottomless pit.

Finally, carrying a loaf of bread around makes me feel  safe. Laugh if you want, but there’s something very powerful about knowing I have so much food that I cannot possibly run out. And by “powerful” I mean “enables me to walk past coffee shops and falafel stands and keep my money in my pocket.”